Issue of August 19, 2012

Memories of one’s first book, of beloved book festivals, of books loved and kept fuel this week’s issue of BiblioBuffet. But we have more, and I strongly encourage everyone who checks us out to look at all our new columns. A brief description of each with a link to it follows. I know you will enjoy each one. Have a good week!

Writing is a dream job for many people, but as Carl Rollyson shares in The Business of Biography it may encompass more difficulties than editing the manuscript, getting an agent, and selling the book. It is a business, no question, and especially for biographers it takes a strong commitment to self as well as sales.

When one lives with 6,000 books (not including e-books), what happens to one’s home? Gillian Polack has, with encouragement, disclosed what it looks like at her home with those books that appeal to her wide-ranging interests stashed and stored in all manner of style in How Do I Love Books, Let Me Count the Ways.

We all have them—the book that made us first fall in love with written stories. For Lev Raphael, that one is The Three Musketeers, but a recent rereading proved that even faithful language translations are not necessarily better than visceral ones to get across the story as intended: No Starch, Please.

They are alive but not necessarily well. This week, Lauren Roberts used her recent updating work on the database that fuels the book festival pages of BiblioBuffet to explore what there really are, where they are, and why supporting them is essential in Celebrating the Festivals.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under BiblioBuffet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s