Issue of May 16, 2010

How and where to read and why finding a new place is providing new experiences. Terrible war experiences that make for one of the best books around. Making baseball cards fun again. A wine fight? Really? Yes, we have all this for you in our new issue. We hope you enjoy it, and we wish you a fabulous week.

Since when did baseball cards take on an air of sadness? When they became collectibles rather than “playthings” says Pete Croatto in his review of a new book on the saga of these pieces of fun-turned-investments in A Hobby’s Sad History.

A poem over a wine fight? Indeed, and a very interesting one by Henri d’Andeli according to Gillian Polack, who tackles his medieval poem that celebrates wines—at lot of them—and insults (no doubt resulting from the wines). But it was less the wine fight she found than a splendid way to teach the writing of prose that prompted her to praise La bataille des vins – Wine fight!

One of the most devastating episodes in the history of World War II battles wasn’t so much a battle as a slaughter—by two sides. The story of a garrison on an island in the Pacific sacrificed by its home nation, captured by the enemy nation, and the captors later targeted by Allied bombing runs is “profoundly engaging story telling” says David Mitchell in It Really was All About Rabaul.

A new reading place and time and what it is giving her is the subject of Lauren Roberts’s musing this week In The Sounds and Sights of Reading.

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2 Comments

Filed under BiblioBuffet

2 responses to “Issue of May 16, 2010

  1. You say it so well here: “With life getting busier and more frantic, it seems that the need for quiet time is increasing (though it may easily go unrecognized) while the opportunity for it decreases.”

    Isn’t it interesting that I wrote a post about the same need for quiet time just two days later? Must have been something in the air…

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